Is Drinking Water Safe For My Baby?

Drinking Water and Babies: What You Need to Know

Infant_Health_Water

One question runs through the minds of new parents every day: Is this safe for my baby? With all household items under new scrutiny, tap water is no exception.

Drinking water is generally safe, so tap water is usually safe for babies–whether you’re mixing infant formula or they’re drinking from a sippy-cup. When there are contaminants, however, even trace amounts pose a higher health risk to babies than adults as babies are more sensitive than adults.

Common contaminants differ a lot based on where you live. Nitrates, for example, are especially prevalent in rural drinking water wells because of their use in fertilizers. Testing water is the only way to know for sure what contaminants are in your water, especially if your water comes from a well, where you have the responsibility to test and treat the water.

Why Are Babies More Vulnerable Than Adults?

Infant health is a major predictor of future outcomes of well being—from adult health to success in school and at work. When so much is at stake, health at birth and for the first year of a child’s life is extremely important.

What’s more, infants are especially sensitive to water quality. They drink more relative to their weight than adults, and so the concentration of chemicals in their body relative to their body weight is higher.

Babies under six months shouldn’t drink plain water at all. If they are drinking formula, however, you often have to mix it with tap water. If your tap water is not safe, your baby will be exposed to contaminants in their formula mix.

In early infancy, babies undergo rapid development, so the impact on their organs and brains are more severe than on adults. In this critical stage, exposure to chemicals can also affect cognitive and physical development.

Babies bodies’ do not have high tolerances to chemical exposures, and thus they are less effective at processing and expelling harmful substances than adults.

What Contaminants Should You Be Most Worried About?

Some contaminants are more common than others and pose a more present threat to infant health. When you’re testing your water with a new baby in the house, you should take a screening approach to scan for a variety of contaminants. However, there are a few common contaminants of particular concern: coliform bacteria, nitrates, and lead.

All of these have different adverse health impacts and require different treatment. Bacteria can cause flu-like symptoms and may indicate the presence of other viruses or parasites.

Nitrates are of particular concern for pregnant women and babies, as they can cause methemoglobinemia, also known as blue-baby syndrome. Methemoglobinemia causes severe oxygen deficiency, which can lead to cyanosis (skin discoloration) and, in extreme cases, suffocation.

Lead is toxic to children — it gets stored in bones and slowly releases over time. Its toxic effectscan harm many different systems in the body.

If you want to read more in depth about any of these potential contaminants, start with Simple Water’s guides on bacterianitrates and heavy metals.

What Can I Do About Contaminated Drinking Water?

While a carbon filter over-the-counter may be sufficient to treat your water, you can’t know until you’ve tested. Knowing what’s in your water is the best first step to protect your baby (and yourself!). Check out our water testing packages to make an informed decision or get in touch with us here for more information.

Sources:

http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/wells/waterquality/safebaby.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4849482/

https://www.nature.com/articles/jes201728

https://prheucsf.blog/2018/07/22/new-method-uncovers-hidden-chemicals-in-pregnant-women/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4849482/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/infant-and-toddler-health/in-depth/infant-formula/art-20045791

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lead-poisoning/symptoms-causes/syc-20354717

http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/lead-poisoning-and-health

https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/full/10.1146/annurev-publhealth-031912-114413

The Link Between Fluoride in Water and ADHD: Should You Be Concerned?

New Findings Suggest Fluoride Connected to An Increased Rate of ADHD in Children

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What is Fluoride?

All water contains some fluoride. Naturally occurring in water, soil, rocks ,and air, fluoride is a mineral also found in your bones and teeth. There have been numerous studies championing the benefits of fluoride on dental health and many U.S. water systems intentionally add fluoride to the drinking water supply.

While fluoride has been added to drinking water for upwards of 70 years in the United States, fluoride has come into the hot seat in recent years. A study published in the Journal Environmental Health found that areas with a higher proportion of artificially fluoridated water also had a higher prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children.

Additionally, a University of Toronto study suggests that higher levels of urinary fluoride during pregnancy are associated with an increase in ADHD-like symptoms in young children.

This begs the question: How concerned should you be about fluoride in drinking water?

What is Artificial Water Fluoridation?

Artificial water fluoridation is the practice of adding low concentrations of fluoride–0.7 parts per million (ppm)–to drinking water with the goal of improving dental health. Despite no legal mandate to fluoridate water, nearly 75% of the U.S. population of people had access to fluoridated water. It is widely considered to be a major factor in the 25% decrease in rates of tooth decay in the United States. While hailed as “one of public health’s greatest success stories” by some, the addition of fluoride to drinking water has always had its skeptics, and some people are downright opposed.

Does Fluoride Increase the Risk of ADHD?

For decades, health experts have disagreed as to whether artificially fluoridated water is toxic to the developing human brain. While extremely high levels can cause dental and skeletal fluorosis, it can also cause neurotoxicity in adults. Far less, however, is known about the impact on children's’ developing brains.  

What Does Research Suggest about the Risks of Fluoride?

Since a popular study on fluoride and neurodevelopment began in 1992, the percentage of the U.S. population that drinks fluoridated water has increased from 56 percent to nearly 70 percent. During that same time frame, the percentage of children with an ADHD diagnosis has increased from around seven percent to more than 11 percent.

Additionally, the 2018 University of Toronto study included the analysis of urine from women during pregnancy, as well as from their children from ages six to 12. Researchers examined how levels of fluoride in urine related to the children’s inattention and hyperactivity. After adjusting factors that impact neuro-development (such as gestational age at birth, birth-weight, birth order, sex, maternal marital status, smoking history, age at delivery, education, socioeconomic status and lead exposure), researchers were able to assign scores related to ADHD. They concluded that prenatal exposure to fluoride was associated with an increased frequency of inattentive behaviors and cognitive problems.

Finally, upwards of 40 studies show that children born in areas with elevated concentrations of fluoride (i.e. above the concentration typically used in U.S. public water system), have lower than average IQs. In fact, many studies demonstrate a significant link–showing that children in high fluoride areas had IQs that were seven points below those of children from areas of low concentrations of fluoride.

How Might Fluoride Increase the Prevalence of ADHD in Children?

The studies mentioned above suggest an association between fluoride and ADHD, however they do not prove causality. The question becomes, how might fluoride increase the prevalence of Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder? Below are some possible links:

Fluoride and Fluorosis:

Several studies suggest that children with moderate to severe fluorosis–i.e. The change in the appearance of tooth enamel due to excessive fluoride intake–can lead to a lower score on IQ tests and other measures of cognitive skills. According to a report by the Center for Disease Control  (CDC) suggests that 41% of Americans ages 12 to 15 have some form of fluorosis.

Fluoride and Lead Absorption:

The form of fluoride typically added to U.S. water supplies (fluorosilicic acid) can leach lead–a potent neurotoxin–from pipes. Research has shown that fluoride may increase the body’s ability to absorb lead and children in regions with highly fluoridated water frequently have elevated blood lead levels. Lead has been shown to play a role in ADHD.

Fluoride and Thyroid:

It’s been proven that fluoride impairs the activity of the thyroid gland, which is important for proper brain development.

Not Everyone Agrees on the Link Between Fluoride and ADHD

These findings have led many people to advocate against fluoride, however others were also eager to point out that this is just one study and may not definitively prove the causal link between fluoridation and ADHD. Limitations on the study include:

  1. Individual fluoride exposures were not measured

  2. ADHD diagnoses were not independently verified

  3. There may be other unknown factors (i.e. confounders) that explain the link

Should You Be Concerned About Fluoride in Drinking Water?

Despite the controversies surrounding artificial water fluoridation, the literature on the matter remains overwhelming positive. Fluoride is safe in low, controlled doses.

If you are concerned about your water quality (for any reason), Tap Score home water testing can help. Tap Score tests for fluoride, as well as 100s of other contaminants. For any questions, send us a message at hello@simplewater.us and our team f chemists, engineers, and water quality experts will be standing by!

Sources:

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/features/fluoride-childrens-health-grandjean-choi/

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/903653

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181010132343.htm

https://www.thechronicleherald.ca/community/health-naturally-fluoride-adhd-link-found-in-recent-study-252381/

https://www.newsweek.com/water-fluoridation-linked-higher-adhd-rates-312748

https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-015-0003-1

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4389999/https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29192688

https://mytapscore.com/blogs/tips-for-taps/why-do-u-s-water-systems-add-fluoride-to-public-water-supplies

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/154164.php

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4841a1.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/statistics/2012stats.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/index.html

https://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/basics/index.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851520/

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3491930/

http://fluoridealert.org/studies/brain01/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3621205/?tool=pmc

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/philippe-grandjean/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5805681/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17420053

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4547570/

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181010132343.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3295994

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4547570/

Arsenic and Water Treatment

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Testing your water and detecting arsenic at any concentration is never good news, but rest assured there are reliable steps you can take to safely protect your health by treating your water.

Arsenic is a well known human carcinogen that occurs naturally in groundwater. Public water systems are regulated by the US EPA to never exceed 10 parts per billion of arsenic concentration, but health research demonstrates that no level of arsenic is safe to drink. In fact, EPA proposed 5 ppb as a standard in 1996. Levels this low have shown statistically significant impacts on IQ among children, but economic requirements for setting maximum contaminant levels have kept the official threshold higher than levels harmful to health.

If you want to remove arsenic from your tap water, there are a few important things you need to know. We’ve broken it down into a simple FAQ sheet.

What is “total arsenic”?

Your total arsenic concentration is generally comprised of two common oxidation states (or forms), arsenic III (aka arsenite) and arsenic V (aka arsenate). In drinking water, we are usually worried about Arsenic V. If you drink water with Arsenic V, however, it is quickly converted to Arsenic III–which is more toxic and bioreactive inside your body.

Does the source of my water make a difference?

The source of your water makes a difference to the amount of arsenic III versus arsenic V in your water. This matters for choosing appropriate treatment options. If your water is coming from a community or public water treatment system and that treatment system uses chlorine for disinfection, then you can generally assume that most arsenic (if found in your water) is in arsenic V form.

If your drinking water comes from a groundwater well and there is no chlorination (or other oxidative step) installed as existing treatment, then you can’t be sure what fraction of your total arsenic is comprised by arsenic III or arsenic V. A type of water quality test called Arsenic Speciation can help determine if your total arsenic is mostly arsenic III or arsenic V.

Does reverse osmosis remove arsenic?

Reverse osmosis water treatment technology can reliably remove arsenic V but does not reliable remove arsenic III. If your water’s arsenic is all or mostly arsenic V then you can reliably use reverse osmosis technology to remove arsenic from your drinking water.

If your water’s arsenic is mostly comprised of arsenic III then you will either need a special treatment technology OR you will need an additional treatment step to oxidize arsenic III to arsenic V before using reverse osmosis for treatment.

Reverse osmosis is not the ONLY method of arsenic removal, companies like AdEdge and others provide other ion exchange and filtration-based treatment options.

Do I need whole home water treatment to remove arsenic?

Whole home water treatment for arsenic removal is NOT necessary unless you regularly drink water from many of the taps in the house. You can safely choose to treat only the water you ingest or use for drinking by installing a Point of Use filter at your main water source in the home or building (like under your kitchen sink). This can save thousands of dollars, because according to public health research, arsenic does not show an appreciable impact on health via showers, tubs, or brushing teeth (unless concentrations are enormous, >1,000 parts per billion).

It is important to note that no treatment technology can ever truly remove a contaminant 100%. Water treatment with reverse osmosis can remove arsenic as much as 98% however. Most professionals and public health research suggests trying to reduce arsenic intake by drinking water to less than 3 parts per billion. 

Get in touch with the Tap Score team here if you have further question about your water quality or about treating arsenic in your water.

Are Microplastics in my Drinking Water?

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Microplastics are in the environment and they are there to stay. 

Microplastics are tiny pieces of plastic, measuring less than five millimeters in length. That’s about the size of a sesame seed, and they can be as small as the period at the end of this sentence (or smaller). 

While you might be familiar with large plastic gyres in the ocean, a recent study suggests that most of the plastic waste in the ocean is not visible on the surface, but rather hidden as microplastics in the water and in marine life. 

An easily recognizable form of microplastics in our everyday life is microbeads–those tiny beads found in face washes and toothpaste. While those microbeads may make your teeth shine and your face shimmer, they’re ending up everywhere in our environment, including our drinking water.

In 2015, President Barack Obama banned microbeads in personal care products and other several countries followed suit. The problem, however, is far from over. Microplastics continue to end up in oceans, lakes, inside animals, and even in drinking water from other sources (like clothing).

Plastic doesn’t decompose or breakdown the way that organic matter does, so when large pieces of plastic degrade into smaller bits, they persist in the environment indefinitely. 

Almost all of the plastic ever manufactured is still on earth. And we're finding it in our drinking water.

Where do Microplastics Come From?

Much of what we manufacture and use (and a huge chunk of our waste) contains plastic. Microplastics come from tires rubbing against pavement, from synthetic clothes, and from paint dust floating through the air. 

Most microplastics are in the form of microfibers. A study commissioned by Patagonia© found that a single fleece coat can release up to 250,000 microfibers in one washing cycle

Are Microplastics in my Drinking Water?

The short answer? Probably, according to a recent study by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and Orb media.

Plastic has long been a problem for ocean and lake ecosystems, leading to the emerging field of study on microplastics. Knowing how pervasive plastic is in our world and our waters, the question remains: are we drinking it too?

Researchers at the University of Minnesota and journalists at Orb sampled drinking water from metropolitan areas around the world. Overall, they found that 81 percent of samples contained microplastics. 

In the US alone, 94% percent of drinking water samples were found to contain microplastics.

Can Microplastics Affect My Health?

What is all this plastic in and around us doing for our health?

Studies have shown that plastic can absorb toxic chemicals in the environment and leach them out. Put simply, plastic can carry toxic chemicals and then release them later on, exposing people to harmful chemicals. This happens after people have ingested microplastics, but also from drinking bottled water that’s been left in the sun. Those toxic chemicals—such as bisphenol A (BPA) and di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), which can disrupt hormone levels — can stay in your gut or move to affect other tissues.

Research has shown that microplastics can also be a vehicle for pollutants such as metals and dioxins, which can cause reproductive and developmental problems.

As plastics break down into smaller and smaller particles, they can infiltrate into tissues, making their way into the bloodstream. Most research has been conducted on the effects of ingesting plastic in wildlife populations, but similar research is beginning with humans.

As microplastics are a relatively recent field of study, the effects of microplastics on human health remain largely unknown.

What Can I Do?

While we don't yet know what the health impacts really are, there are a few ways you can filter your water that will likely remove microplastics:

1) Carbon filter

2) Reverse osmosis 

3) Ion exchange 

In selecting a treatment technology, check the pore-size. Microplastics in the Orb study were about 2.5 microns. A filter with a pore size less than 2.5 microns will remove most microplastics from your tap water. 

Don't hesitate to get in touch if you would like more suggestions, or if you want to test your water for microplastics to learn more. 

Sources:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004896971730207

https://www.outsideonline.com/2091876/patagonias-new-study-finds-fleece-jackets-are-serious-pollutant

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/10/12/124006/meta

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0194970

https://orbmedia.org/stories/Invisibles_plastics/multimedia

http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/364/1526/2153?utm_source=trend_md&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=TrendMD_RS_Sales

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep03263?ncid=edlinkushpmg00000313

https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/reveh.2013.28.issue-1/reveh-2012-0030/reveh-2012-0030.xml

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969717302073

http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/dioxins-and-their-effects-on-human-health

http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/364/1526/2153?utm_source=trend_md&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=TrendMD_RS_Sales

http://pulse.seattlechildrens.org/study-links-chemical-in-plastics-to-genital-abnormalities-in-baby-boys/

Imagine A Day Without Water...

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What would a day without water look like? No water to drink, shower with, or even to flush a toilet. If it’s challenging for you to imagine–then you are very fortunate.

While most Americans can’t imagine a day without water, there are many communities that have lived, and are currently living, without water because they don’t have access to safe and reliable water treatment and distribution systems.

It’s time to think about what this means and do something about it!

88% of Americans Agree On Something?

October 10th is Imagine a Day Without Water–a national day of action to raise awareness about the value of water in our lives. We at SimpleWater, are proudly joining the cause. We want to leverage our collective power, educate decision makers, and inspire communities to recognize and put water infrastructure on the agenda for improvement. No other issue facing our public officials has such a broad consensus as water quality and sanitation–with 88 percent of Americans support increasing federal investment to rebuild water infrastructure, and 75 percent of Americans want Congress to invest in our nation’s water infrastructure before our systems fail. A day without water is a public health and safety crisis and the reality is, America's water infrastructure is failing. This infrastructure supports every facet of our daily lives, but it is facing a myriad of challenges. These challenges look different to different communities and will require local solutions, but it’s clear that this demands our attention.

In honor of this campaign, we’re offering a special 10% discount today on any of our Tap Score water testing package with the code: DayWithoutWater10

No community can thrive without water, and everyone deserves a safe, reliable, accessible water services. Investing in our water is investing in a future where no American will have to imagine a day without water.

For more information about the campaign and ways to participate, take a look at here.



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